Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Well, folks, it loks like's DMGI's done it..

The p;eople who uploaded GUMNBY episodes seem to have removed them, though thbey still have the rights to the Holiday Speicals with the characters. ["Daniel Boone","Gigantor" and others were controlled by DMGI..]

Saturday, June 13, 2009

A COUPLE of Things-The stock Cues and Dal McKennon

If you want to know about the canned music on this as used in Hanna-Barbera, anothjer fellow's site this is a good resource.

The Pokester.

And as of August 2009, Dal McKennon, the voices of the characters in many short,s passed away. He was in shorts from everything from later Lantz shorts to the relaly awful Filmation Archie shows, which had his short lived Gumby unsped voice. Also in many Disneyland attractions and even in at least on one of Looney Tunes, a Speedy Gonzales called "Torilla Flaps".

Heard in many Disney records, and in Sam Singer cartoons ["Sinbad Jr.", though uncredited,] and in a small company, A&A's "Q.T.Hush".

Monday, June 1, 2009

Here's an interesting thread..

I participated in this as well.

GUMBY AND HB MUSIC CUES

Enjoy.

POKEY


Horse

DVD GUMBY 7-Disc SET - REVIEW

This is a hopefully, brief, review of the 2002 set.
Without even buying it, I know, from the elements which i've heard are on,
that it sucks. Due to the familiar situation [soundtrack licenciing rights],
the 1987 synthesiser score byh "Jerry Gerber" was installed on the 1980s remakes
of Gumby shows and used here. Happily, creator Art Clokey and son managed to relicense the music for a small number of shorts, and as I've mentioned, CARLIN, especially and other firms have more and more started to carry this stuff, including the long unavaible cues of William Loose, Jack Cookerly and some others. Anyway, the shorts ARE, in order, the n1950s-60s ones in original order, and longer versions, but the need to stil, use the more legally avaible and cheaper 1980 synth soundtracks louses it [but the 1980s shows with ME, Gumby and the gang in an amateur[ish] band have to take the ckae--none of the 1980s ones, on other collections, are on this, but the legally mandated resoundtracking in 1988 doesn't make it much better, either].Rhino released this colleciton. Since then CLASSIC MEDIA have the rights.

SPEAKING of which....:)!

For a MUCH more recent
and satisfactory colection go HERE:

If you REALLY want the revisiionist soundtracks, are a masochist [JUST kidding!] or need to hear what the redone tracks were like..:rolleyes:
go HERE:

Sticky Pokey

As "Pokey", here's something back on topic, and that this will stay.. and the first Gumby episode review..

Clokey Pords.
1967.Color.

Cast
Gumby/NORMA MacMILLAN
Pokey[/Profkapp]/DALLAS MCKENNON [my voice is mislisted as DAL mcKINNON on some credits]

Music: Probaly CONZELMANN-TREDE-HAESNCH & VAN PHILLIPS;theme by PETE KLEINOW
Wirtten and Directed by ART CLOIKEY, RAY PECK & PETER PETE KLEINOW

SYNOPSIS: Pokey's on the run and it's up to Gumby and Prof.Kapp to trap the Blockheads who chase him.



We open with a briefly truncated sub-main title of the "Gumby" episode title slide whistle themePokey--me--is/are running through the locla toystore, as the blockheads are after Me. Gumby takes m e-aka Pokey, to Prof.Kapp, a character who debuted in a solo experimental pilot, "Space Ball", then did a number of mid 60s Gumby shorts. Professor Kapp devises his stickiest glue in the world [yeah, I know, how does he know---but keep reading friends]. He melds the glue. It is turned into a shape of me. "I'm" placed to a side of the street. I, hereby third pony as Pokey, go up and razz the B'heads, causing those darn Blockheads to chase after Pokey, [me], and Pokey and the Blcokheads onc eliterally cross an abandoned street lioght less rural interseciton before allowing the blockheads to go to horse clue. After all, sometimes a pony's gotta be faithful to a pot of glue!

COMMENTS
On "The World According to Gumby", FHE, 1980s.

The title's sticky glue poot kettle resembles an acorn.A nut. That's what I must be to volounteer for this. -Pokey.There's a period on the end of the title.